Focus Events Overview

Introduction
Software Strategies Focus meetings each cover a specific industry topic in some depth, with special efforts made to obtain highly qualified expert speakers in the topic area. These Focus meetings have always struck a strong chord with participants, who invariably prefer to attend our non-partisan, multi-vendor perspective, analyst-moderated events, rather than the usual single vendor marketing seminars available. Using an intense one-day format, our Focus meetings frequently draw 100+ delegates, who find them a highly effective vehicle for quickly gaining in-depth insight into the particular enterprise computing themes covered.

Focus Event Venues
The Focus Event venues will all be in the London and Thames Valley area for this year, with exact locations being listed as they are firmed up. These venues are normally provided by our participating vendor speaker companies, and we have in the past been very generously hosted in the highest quality, and prestigious event locations thanks to their hospitality. These events frequently attract capacity audiences, and early booking is therefore advised to avoid disappointment.

Focus Event Fees
These events are offered at no fee to qualified IT personnel, who we encourage to attend as many of the events as they are able to schedule. However, we are obliged to levy a charge a 75.00 no-show fee to any delegate who enrols but does not attend (and provides less than 48 hour's notice) in order to cover lunch, refreshments and administration costs incurred.

 
Future Focus Events - 2002
 
New Event Themes for 2002
For next year, we have developed a short list of six additional theme areas, based on our extensive research, discussions with enterprise vendor as well as IT user organisations and delegate feedback from previous events. Each of these key themes encompass broad and sometimes overlapping strategic issues, and are briefly described in the following sections.
 
Theme
Dates
Venue
Enterprise Storage Architectures with Windows 2000
TBA
TBA
Windows 2002 - The Next Step
TBA
TBA
Linux as an Enterprise OS Platform
TBA
TBA
Enterprise DBMS for 2002
TBA
TBA
Security Issues in Enterprise Environments
TBA
TBA
 
Enterprise Storage Architectures With Windows 2000
Extending NAS and SAN Infrastructures to Intel Platforms
Venue TBA
   

Concept
Storage volume demand continues to grow at an accelerated pace. Costs of storage and storage management are now outrunning server costs, so are becoming an increasingly critical issue for all enterprises. But which storage architecture to use, how to consolidate across e-business networks, and provide seamless high availability data to the enterprise? Windows 2000 is an increasingly important platform, but how to integrate it with existing enterprise storage schemes? What's the current state of play, and what examples are there of good practice?

Scope
Architectures (DAS, SAN, NAS), Windows 2000 storage issues, storage consolidation, key role of ESM software, technologies, standards, examples, etc.

 
Windows 2002 - The Next Step
What Does It Bring - Should You Upgrade?
Venue TBA
   

Concept
This Focus Meeting provides a major update and advisory overview of the Windows 2002 product family, by then available. Although briefly highlighting major new function/feature, centred on strategic advantages and risks in adopting/migrating vs. a conservative wait-and-see approach. Discusses integration with other platforms, new/enhanced inter-operability standards, and any compelling reasons to adopt early, including easier platform consolidation. Features pre-release experiences from both early adopter users as well as alliance vendors, and best practices for phased implementation.

Scope
Widows 2002 Product family. New/enhanced interoperability standards; arguments for and against adoption or migration from NT/2000. Positioning and outlook, including 64bit and top-end mainframe computing. Impact on user planning considerations.

 
Linux as an Enterprise OS Platform?
How Does it Rate in 2002 - When will it be There?
Venue TBA
   

Concept
There has been a huge rise in interest in and usage of Linux since its inception, but how close is it yet to being an enterprise-class OS? It is still largely deployed in small to medium server environments (as was NT until relatively recently). How soon before it will challenge Windows for the high ground? Issues include enterprise-class availability, scalability, manageability, the evolution of a powerful and integrated "software stack", a believable road map, and high-ground case study examples.

Scope
Centred around the evidence as it emerges for "enterprise" characteristics" for this new platform - availability, reliability, scalability, capacity, performance etc., and the critical areas where it is still lacking today.

 
Enterprise Database Management Systems for 2002
SQL Server 2000, DB2, or Oracle?
Venue TBA
   

Concept
Database management systems remain a key, core component of enterprise IT e-Infrastructures. Recent years has seen a shakeout in the DBMS industry, with three major winners emerging at the enterprise level - Microsoft, Oracle and IBM. Sybase is still there, but Informix's database business has been bought by IBM. Many factors influence the choice of DBMS for enterprise customers - including platform/OS investment, core business application demands, surrounding software stack, and in-house experience and expertise. What's to choose between these three in practice, and should users consider changing their current DBMS? What are the advantages and implications of doing so?

Scope
And what about the other players such as Sybase et al? This event will focus on strategic assessment of the strengths and capabilities of each DBMS and its "native" platform & software stack of choice, rather than detailed function/feature treatments. DBMS choice can also influence choice of platform and the set of collaborating vendor partners whose products and services are optimised to inter-operate with each other.

 
Security Issues in Windows 2000 E-Business Environments
How Secure is Your Windows 2000 E-Commerce Platform?
Venue TBA
   

Concept
As IT organisations open their up business systems to customers, partners and suppliers via new e-commerce based processes and transactions, the need to manage, audit, track and protect complex, evolving and heterogeneous back-end systems has never been more important. What have Microsoft and its partners brought to the table to address these hugely complex yet critical issues for Windows 2000-based e-business environments, and how can they facilitate high-speed e-business with maximum security and minimum human dependence?

Scope
Focused on Windows 2000 e-business security systems, but including links to all back-end platform business systems in the "firing line". What integrated, automated facilities are now available or buildable, and what are their scope and limitations?